While there are many strong and progressive female celebrities (thank you Gloria Steinem, Lena Dunham, Amy Poehler and others!) who have worked incredibly hard to fight for women's rights, it's refreshing to see a number of male celebrities step up with their own thoughts. Here are 15 celebrity men and what they have to say about feminism:

Daniel Radcliffe
Daniel Radcliffe
In an interview, Radcliffe shed light on his views on "the friend zone": "Do I think men and women can be friends? Yes, absolutely. Do I think men and women who are sexually attracted to each other can just be friends? Eh, it will probably become an issue at some point whether you deal with it, and talk about it and just move on, but it will always sort of get dealt with eventually…. I definitely think the idea of friend zone is just men going, ‘This woman won’t have sex with me.’"
Patrick Stewart
Patrick Stewart
In a speech he gave for Amnesty International UK in October 2009, Patrick Stewart remembered the impact of his father's abuse of his mother had on his childhood: "Even if she had [done something to provoke my father to hit her], violence is a choice. And it’s a choice that a man makes. We can choose to stop it."
Mark Ruffalo
Mark Ruffalo
In 2013, 46-year-old Mark Ruffalo wrote a letter supporting the reproductive rights of women. After reflecting on the aftermath of his mother's own illegal abortion, he used the letter to rally supporters: "I invite you to find your voice and let it be known that you stand for abortion rights and the dignity of a woman to be the master of her own life and body. I invite you to search your soul and ask yourself if you actually stand for what you say you stand for. Thank you for being here today and thank you for standing up for the women in my life."
David Schwimmer
David Schwimmer
In a June 2011 interview, the "Friends" actor talked about his activism and affiliation with The Rape Foundation in Santa Monica, California.  After two important experiences, he was ready to act: "I’ve had two girlfriends who were victims of child sexual abuse, and one was also later a date-rape victim. That sensitized me to the issue in a way that I hadn’t been before."
John Legend
John Legend
John Legend is well known for his words on self-acceptance in women. He took his song about body and self-love, "You & I (Nobody In The World)," and stopped to add a few more words during his performance in 2013: "All men should be feminists. If men care about women's rights the world will be a better place...We are better off when women are empowered — it leads to a better society."
Jon Hamm
Jon Hamm
The famous "Mad Men" star expressed the most important thing he learned from his time on the show: "Men ruled the roost and women played a subservient role [in the 1960s]. Working wives were a rarity, because their place was in the home, bringing up the kids. The women who did work were treated as second-class citizens, because it was a male-dominated society. That was a fact of life then. But it wouldn’t be tolerated today, and that’s quite right in my book...People look back on those days through a thick veil of nostalgia, but life was hard if you were anything other than a rich, powerful, white male."
Seth Meyers
Seth Meyers
"When you work with the sort of really strong women that I work with, the idea that anyone would want to make decisions for them is hard to wrap your head around," said the new Late Night host in a 2012 interview.
Louis C.K.
Louis C.K.
Louis C.K. has always been on-point with his self-reflective comedy on privilege and gender. In his 2013 HBO special, "Oh My God," he hit the issue with a serious and funny punch: "How do women still go out with guys, when you consider that there is no greater threat to women than men? We're the No. 1 threat to women! Globally and historically, we're the No. 1 cause of injury and mayhem to women. You know what our No. 1 threat is? Heart disease."
Joseph Gordon-Levitt
Joseph Gordon-Levitt
The self-proclaimed feminist explained why his film "Don Jon," which was seen as controversial and progressive, was an important one to tell: "My mom brought me up to be a feminist. She would always point out to my brother and me that our culture does often portray women like objects...She wanted me and my brother to be aware of it because we see these images on TV, in the movies and on magazines all the time. And if you don't stop and think about it, it just sort of seeps into your brain and that becomes the way you perceive reality."
Will Smith
Will Smith
When he was asked why he allowed his daughter, Willow, to cut off all her hair in May 2012, he responded with this incredible remark: "We let Willow cut her hair. When you have a little girl, it’s like how can you teach her that you’re in control of her body? If I teach her that I’m in charge of whether or not she can touch her hair, she’s going to replace me with some other man when she goes out in the world. She can’t cut my hair but that’s her hair. She has got to have command of her body. So when she goes out into the world, she’s going out with a command that is hers. She is used to making those decisions herself. We try to keep giving them those decisions until they can hold the full weight of their lives."
Jay Baruchel
Jay Baruchel
The voice behind "How To Train Your Dragon" explained in a 2012 interview why he prefers writing female characters into his work: "I do [prefer writing women characters], just because I'm a mama's boy. I was raised by my mom, I have a little sister, and I'm constantly annoyed [by] how terribly written most females are in most everything and especially in comedy. Their anatomy seems to be the only defining aspect of their character, and I just find that untruthful and it straight-up offends me. A lot of the strongest people I know are chicks. And as a viewer, I get a kick out of watching real characters. So I take it upon myself to clean that shit up and write actual women. And I like writing strong women, because as a straight male, there's nothing more attractive to me than a strong girl."
Ashton Kutcher
Ashton Kutcher
During a 2011 interview, Ashton discussed just how poor most sex education is on female sexuality: "The male orgasm is actually right there and readily available to learn about because it's actually part of the reproductive cycle, but the female orgasm isn't really talked about in the education system. Part of that creates a place where women aren't empowered around their own sexuality and their own sexual selves, and from a purely entertainment point of view, to create a movie with a female lead that's empowered with her own sexuality is a powerful thing. And if we can give teenage people something to think about from a sex perspective, I would say it would be to open a conversation where women are empowered with their own sexual experiences from an educational level as well as an entertainment level."
Barack Obama
Barack Obama
President Obama is no stranger to women's rights. He signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Restoration Act into law in 2009, that makes it easier for women to sue their employer for wage discrimination. In a 2012 speech discussing the act, the president said: "Too often women can't access the information they need to fight the pay discrimination...Women can't wait for equal pay. And I won't stop fighting to address this inequality."
Joss Whedon
Joss Whedon
The Avengers writer took an insightful approach to answering the question, "Why do you create strong female characters?" at a 2006 Equality Now event: "Because, equality is not a concept. It's not something we should be striving for. It's a necessity. Equality is like gravity. We need it to stand on this earth as men and women, and the misogyny that is in every culture is not a true part of the human condition."
Donald McPherson
Donald McPherson
Former NFL quarterback Donald McPherson has started many outreach programs and regularly speaks at college campuses on ending domestic and sexual violence. In a 2013 article about stopping violence against women, he wrote: "What can men do [to stop violence against women]? Men do not just need to stop being violent. The vast majority of men are not violent. But men do need to stop being silent. Calling violence against women, whether street harassment or sexual harassment or rape or murder, a "women's issue" allows men to ignore it as if we have no responsibility for it or stake in ending it. We all have grandmothers, mothers, sisters, daughters and female friends and colleagues. Our lives are inextricably interwoven; women's issues of safety and equality directly affect our lives as men. Beyond that, women are humans, with the same rights to safety and freedom as men. It is therefore our moral responsibility to not remain silent or passively on the sidelines, but to be actively engaged in confronting this problem in every corner of homes, communities, and societies."